July E-News

ORANGUTANS

Newborn in Lamandau Wildlife Reserve!

Mores, a resident of Camp JL in the Reserve, in Indonesian Borneo, had been observed as being pregnant due to her increased feeding and general behaviour around camp. She was then spotted last month by our field team who were thrilled to see her ‘showing off’ her newborn; pictured here holding on tight:

Mores will teach her daughter all she knows. It will take several years for her baby to be able to feed and move about the forest independently.  For more details, please read our    blog.

Mores will teach her daughter all she knows. It will take several years for her baby to be able to feed and move about the forest independently. For more details, please read our blog.

FORESTS

Forest Restoration Programme

Earlier this month, Julia Cissell from German NGO Orangu-Utans in Not e.V. that support our forest restoration programme, accompanied our field team as they set out to monitor the progress of our habitat rehabilitation site within the Lamandau Wildlife Reserve.

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To date, this important programme has planted around 60,000 seedlings with the aim of adding a further 30,000 in the coming year.

Crocodile mother and hatchlings caught on camera

It’s not just orangutans that have been spotted with new young, our monitoring team located in Tanjung Puting National Park were fortunate enough to capture intimate images of a mother crocodile guarding her nest, listening to her young’s calls as they hatch, and then gently clearing a path for them to emerge.

See if you can hear the hatchlings call for their mother from inside the nest by watching the video on our     blog.

See if you can hear the hatchlings call for their mother from inside the nest by watching the video on our blog.

PEOPLE

Our 2019 Volunteer Programme is underway!

On Monday 22nd July, this year’s group of volunteers gathered together ahead of their three-week programme with the Foundation.

We wish them well and thank them for all their hard work!

We wish them well and thank them for all their hard work!

Visit to the field

Last month, Director Ashley Leiman lead a successful orangutan conservation group tour in collaboration with Steppes Travel to Tanjung Puting National Park.

Following this tour, she then received an update on the Foundation’s conservation programmes in the field, spent time with the team in our Indonesia office, and had a meeting with Pak Helmi, head of Tanjung Puting National Park, for an update on the park’s progress.

Orangutan-friendly goodies!

We’d like to say a big thank you to Paterson Arran. The Scottish baking company have been making delicious treats for almost 125 years and recently updated their range of palm-oil-free goodies, making them orangutan friendly!

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Not only have they printed this message on their packaging to raise awareness of orangutans and the loss of their vulnerable forest habitat, they’ve also contributed directly to the Orangutan Foundation by adopting two orangutans and funding a guard post which protects 20,000 acres of forest in the Lamandau Wildlife Reserve.

Staff update:

We were sad to say farewell to a longstanding member of the UK Orangutan Foundation team, Cathy. She has been an instrumental part of the Foundation for may years and we wish her the best of luck with all of her future endeavours.

In exchange, we say hello to new team member, Rob. He comes to us after previous experience working with orangutans in Borneo and Sumatra in the past. He’ll be a welcome addition to the team.

June E-News

Two rescued orangutans returned to the wild

Shifa is now living free in the protected Lamandau Wildlife Reserve

Shifa is now living free in the protected Lamandau Wildlife Reserve

Two critically endangered orangutans are now back in the wild, where they belong, thanks to the dedicated work of the Orangutan Foundation’s team and the Natural Resources Conservancy Agency of Central Kalimantan (BKSDA). Watch video of Shifa’s release.

Ashley Leiman OBE, Orangutan Foundation Founder and Director/Trustee, was present for the two releases and was encouraged to see how readily both orangutans clambered up into the trees to begin their new life.

As soon as the transport cage door opened Shifa shot straight out and climbed up the nearest tree.

As soon as the transport cage door opened Shifa shot straight out and climbed up the nearest tree.

Both orangutans were wild born but tragically ended up orphaned. Shifa was rescued from being kept as a pet in September 2016, when she was only 2-years-old. Panglima, was rescued at the end of March 2019, from community forest, he is thought to be about 5-years-old but showed extremely wild behaviour . Read full story here.

5-year-old orangutan, Panglima, released into the reserve.

5-year-old orangutan, Panglima, released into the reserve.

Shifa was taken to the 158,000-acre protected Lamandau Wildlife Reserve, Central Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. She lived at Camp Buluh, one of five post-release monitoring sites in the reserve, which she shared with Okto, another orphaned orangutan. The two young orangutans were great playmates and Okto helped Shifa to adjust to her new life.

Okto (right) and Shifa (left) in 2017

Okto (right) and Shifa (left) in 2017

Shifa and Panglima have had to overcome massive hurdles early on in their life. Our challenge now is to ensure the rest of their life is spent in the wild. We are doing this by safeguarding their globally important forest habitat in the Lamandau Wildlife Reserve. Orangutan Foundation actively monitor the reserve with a network of guard posts and regular patrolling to prevent illegal activities from destroying the forests and harming wildlife.

May E-News

ORANGUTANS

The young orangutans in our soft-release programme are going from strength to strength.

Mona and Adib are the best of playmates, they like to play-fight and swing around in the trees. Mona (on the right) is always the first to instigate the game, approaching Adib (left) and then the fun begins! Our staff take all of the young orphaned orangutans into the forest each day to play and learn the skills needed to survive in the wild.

Adib (left) and Mona (right)

Adib (left) and Mona (right)

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Update on rescued orangutan

When Panglima was first rescued he wouldn’t use the tyre swing or browse in his enclosure - the team looking after him felt sure he would but it would take time. They were right!

FORESTS

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PEOPLE

Read our latest blog post to find out what’s been going on at Pondok Ambung Tropical Forest Research Station, Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesian Borneo.

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