KEEPING FORESTS STANDING AND ORANGUTANS IN THE WILD

The Orangutan Foundation runs its own programmes in Central Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. We place a strong emphasis on capacity building of key stakeholders who include local communities, local NGO’s, local business and regional government. With their inclusion comes conservation success and sustainability.

“I have seen first-hand what wonderful work the Foundation is doing, and I am sure that the situation today is better than it would have been without it. But there is still a great deal to be done. May your past successes encourage you and give you the strength to tackle what lies ahead.”

Sir David Attenborough

WHERE ORANGUTAN FOUNDATION WORKS

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TANJUNG PUTING NATIONAL PARK  

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We are helping to conserve:

  • 4,100 critically endangered orangutans

  • 393,800 acres of habitat

The park has one of the largest orangutan populations in Borneo. Orangutan Foundation protect this globally important forest ecosystem by running two guard posts and assisting the national park with routine patrols.

The Orangutan Foundation’s PONDOK AMBUNG TROPICAL FOREST RESEARCH STATION studies the national park’s fauna and flora including the Western tarsier and false gharial crocodile (Tomistoma Schlegeii).

LAMANDAU WILDLIFE RESERVE

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We are helping to conserve:

  • 600 critically endangered orangutans

  • 158,000 acres of habitat

The Lamandau Wildlife Reserve is one of the few sites where rescued orangutans are released back into the wild. To ensure the orangutans return successfully they are monitored from five release camps by a team of Indonesian staff and a vet.

To protect the reserve Orangutan Foundation has a series of manned guard posts, situated at strategic points. Each post is a base for routine forests patrols and fire-fighting.

THE BELANTIKAN ARUT REGION

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We are helping to conserve:

  • 3,100 critically endangered orangutans

  • 1,193,600 acres of habitat

With over 80% of orangutans outside of protected areas it is vital that these populations are conserved.  The Orangutan Foundation and Yayorin, a local Indonesian organisation, established the Belantikan Conservation Programme with its overall objective being to conserve the remaining forested areas and its unique biodiversity including the Bornean flat-headed frog – the world’s only lungless frog- and the spectacular amorphophallus flower, which grow up to two metres tall